Abandoned subdomains pose security risk for businesses

Many companies set up subdomains for use with external services, but then forget to disable them when they stop using those services, creating a loophole for attackers to exploit.Because many service providers don’t properly validate the ownership of subdomains pointed at their servers, attackers can set up new accounts and abuse subdomains forgotten by companies by claiming them as their own.Removing or updating DNS entries for subdomains that are no longer actively used sounds like something that should be common procedure, but according to researchers from Detectify, a Stockholm-based provider of website security scanning services, this type of oversight is actually quite widespread among companies.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 9:10 am

BrandPost: The Rise of a New Domain in Network Cloud Technology

Enterprise IT is currently moving through an accelerated pace of innovation that is driving more change today than during any time in recent memory. Whether it involves managing virtual machines at scale or a total reinvention of how applications are deployed and managed in the cloud, all these innovations have one thing in common: they require access to robust networking services to actually work.With that issue in mind, we at AT&T set about rethinking the role of the network in the modern enterprise.Thanks to the rise of mobile computing and the Internet of Things (IoT), there are more endpoints trying to access backend IT services than ever before.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 8:00 am

Chicago takes top spot in mobile performance ranking

Chicago is the U.S. city with the best overall mobile performance ranking, according to tens of thousands of voice and data tests conducted in 125 cities by RootMetrics. The metropolis dubbed the Windy City originally got its nickname in the 1890s because of its reputation for bragging, and not just because of the fierce winter winds blowing off Lake Michigan. And so, it seems the bragging is bound to continue.MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: 12 most powerful Internet of Things companies "Chicago was the only city with top ranking in multiple performance categories," RootMetrics reported in its online analysis posted on Monday.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 7:13 am

IBM’s chip business sale gets national security scrutiny

IBM's plan to transfer its semiconductor manufacturing business to GlobalFoundries faces a government review over national security implications. It has the potential of being complicated because of IBM's role as a defense supplier.GlobalFoundries is based in the U.S., but is owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, which is part of the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.). IBM is paying the firm $1.5 billion to take over its semiconductor manufacturing operations. IBM says it isn't cutting back on R&D or its design of semiconductors, but will rely on GlobalFoundries for manufacturing.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 7:11 am

4 security tips for Apple Pay users

Many security experts agree that Apple Pay and contactless payment systems like it are an improvement over traditional credit-card based systems. However, Apple Pay is still new and relatively untested, and it's wise to approach it strategically. [Related: Security, Payments Experts Talk Apple Pay] Peter Olynick, card and payments practice lead with Carlisle & Gallagher Consulting Group, a management-technology consulting firm, says the following four best practices are a great way to get started with Apple Pay.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 7:05 am

Microsoft misses Windows bug, hackers slip past patch

Microsoft patched one bug in Windows last week, but missed another that hackers continue to exploit, according to security researchers at McAfee.On Tuesday, Microsoft confirmed that cyber criminals are targeting victims using tricked-out PowerPoint files that exploit a "zero-day" vulnerability, or a bug that has not been patched."Microsoft is aware of a vulnerability affecting all supported releases of Microsoft Windows, excluding Windows Server 2003," the company said in a security advisory yesterday. "At this time, we are aware of limited, targeted attacks that attempt to exploit the vulnerability through Microsoft PowerPoint."To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:58 am

IBM and Microsoft pledge to make their clouds compatible

Although fierce rivals in the market for cloud computing services, IBM and Microsoft have pledged to make their technologies interoperable in the cloud for the sake of their users.On Wednesday, the companies jointly announced that many Microsoft enterprise products would run on IBM's infrastructure and platform services, and that many key IBM middleware products would be available for use on Microsoft Azure.MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: 10 Most Powerful IaaS Companies "The cloud is an interesting change in the technology landscape. In a lot of ways it opens everybody up to be your partner as well as your competitor, more so than on-premise software did in the past," said Michael Curry, IBM vice president of WebSphere product management. "The key element here is about offering choice for our customers -- to have the flexibility to deploy software in lots of different places."To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:56 am

What you'll love and hate about Windows 10

What Windows diehards will love and hate about Windows 10The buzz of Microsoft’s leap to Windows 10 may be dimming, but the big, 640-million-user question remains: If you skipped Windows 8 because the initial two-face kludge left you cold, should you think about upgrading to Windows 10? Or has Microsoft gone down so weird a tiled rabbit hole that you should dig your heels into Win7 and kiss the new direction good-bye?To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:52 am

8 big trends in big data analytics

Bill Loconzolo, vice president of data engineering at Intuit, jumped into a data lake with both feet. Dean Abbott, chief data scientist at Smarter Remarketer, made a beeline for the cloud. The leading edge of big data and analytics, which includes data lakes for holding vast stores of data in its native format and, of course, cloud computing, is a moving target, both say. And while the technology options are far from mature, waiting simply isn’t an option.MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: Big data's biggest challenges “The reality is that the tools are still emerging, and the promise of the [Hadoop] platform is not at the level it needs to be for business to rely on it,” says Loconzolo. But the disciplines of big data and analytics are evolving so quickly that businesses need to wade in or risk being left behind. “In the past, emerging technologies might have taken years to mature,” he says. “Now people iterate and drive solutions in a matter of months — or weeks.” So what are the top emerging technologies and trends that should be on your watch list — or in your test lab? Computerworld asked IT leaders, consultants and industry analysts to weigh in. Here’s their list.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:47 am

HP gives Moonshot server its first Xeon chip

If Hewlett-Packard’s Moonshot server doesn’t pan out, it won’t be for lack of trying.Its engineers have been hard at work this year adding various different CPU options for Moonshot, which uses a novel design to reduce energy and space requirements and is a big part of CEO Meg Whitman’s effort to get HP back on track.Just last month, HP released a Moonshot system with a 64-bit ARM processor, becoming the first vendor to offer such a chip in a server. And on Thursday HP released its first Moonshot server with an Intel Xeon chip.The company already offered a version with Intel’s low-power Atom processor, and Xeon now provides an option for customers who want a bit more compute muscle.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:45 am

Cashiers don't understand Apple Pay and it's totally adorable

Apple Pay is so easy to use it’s almost not worth writing about. It’s laughably fast and stupidly simple. So simple it’s confusing the heck out of clerks and cashiers nationwide!Here’s how it works: You walk up to the kind of payment terminal where you would normally swipe your credit or debit card. You notice a little icon that looks like a sideways Wi-Fi symbol—that means you can also use contactless payments, like those tap-and-go Mastercards that no one uses. That’s your clue!MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: 12 most powerful Internet of Things companies So instead of swiping a card, you hold your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus near the terminal, your default Apple Pay card pops up on the screen, you smugly put your thumb on the Touch ID button, and boom, transaction completed. It took me approximately 17 times longer to type this than it does to actually make a payment.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:45 am

Future points to healthcare IT as a Service

IT leaders today frequently mention the importance of bringing social, mobile, analytics and cloud technology – the so-called "SMAC stack" – into a single, integrated architecture.In healthcare, this type of architecture will do more than simply help the industry catch up to other verticals, says David Dimond, CTO of EMC's Global Healthcare Business. SMAC will help organizations demonstrate a return on investment in electronic health record (EHR) systems beyond meaningful use by providing IT as a service both within and outside hospital walls.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:40 am

Vintage Apple-1 sells for a record $905K

A 38-year-old working Apple-1 personal computer sold Wednesday at auction for a record $905,000, almost double the auctioneer's high-end estimate. The aged Apple-1 -- the first pre-assembled personal computer, although it lacked such amenities as power supply, keyboard or display -- was sold by auction house Bonhams in New York to The Ford Foundation, which will put it on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. (See what the 2013 auction brought in.) The final gavel price was $750,000, but including Bonhams' commission of $175,000 and taxes, the total was $905,000. That easily beat the record of $671,000 for another working Apple-1, set in May 2013.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:35 am

Startup Instartlogic ushers in the era of software-defined application delivery

Application delivery has always been a huge pain in the neck. There are so many factors to consider – the device, browser, wired network, wireless network, cloud provider, etc. Frankly, considering all of the variables involved in delivering applications, it’s remarkable that anything works at all. Between the application and the user, there are many points where problems can occur. There’s the application itself – some aren’t network-friendly, queries can be lengthy, sometimes the application is faster than the device it runs on, sometimes it’s the other way around. Then there’s the data center or cloud provider – how much can it scale, how fast is the network, where are the points of latency and storage interconnects. The last mile is an issue as well – wired and wireless have significantly different characteristics. Other issues include the operating system, distance that the data travels, and the endpoint itself. Diversity, distance, congestion, latency, and topology all play a role in how applications perform over networks.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 6:30 am

What Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg said in Mandarin that so impressed the Chinese

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg stunned many Chinese on Thursday, not with a new Facebook feature, but because he spoke and answered questions in Mandarin for almost half an hour.Zuckerberg gave a talk in Chinese at Tsinghua University on Wednesday, and later posted a recording of the event to his Facebook page. The video quickly spread online, generating much surprise and praise from local Internet users.“Such an awesome person is learning Chinese, why is my own English so bad,” wrote one user on Chinese social networking site Sina Weibo.Zuckerberg spoke with a strong accent, but handled the language confidently enough to impress the Chinese. Increasingly, executives from the biggest tech companies in the world are visiting the country, but rarely do they speak in Mandarin, let alone for such a long period, or field questions from the audience.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 23 October 2014 | 2:55 am

Vietnam police hunt hackers behind mass outage

Vietnamese cybersecurity authorities are hunting hackers believed to be responsible for the country’s biggest-ever online attack last week, according to the founder of a security website in Hanoi.“This is the biggest cyber-attack ever in Vietnam, affecting the Vietnam security community,” Tran Quang Chien of SecurityDaily.Net wrote in an email. “This was a targeted malicious attack.”The incident that began Oct. 13 saw the outage of multiple websites under Vietnam Communications (VCCorp), an Internet company in Vietnam that owns more than 20 websites such as news portal Dan Tri.The news sites affiliated with VCCorp came back online, but some others took a number of days to recover. The outage was first described by VCCorp as a data center glitch.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 11:50 pm

Apple to stop SSL 3.0 support for push notifications soon

Apple will stop support next week for an encryption protocol found to contain a severe vulnerability, the company said on Wednesday.Support for SSL 3.0 will cease as of Oct. 29, it said.“Providers using only SSL 3.0 will need to support TLS as soon as possible to ensure the Apple Push Notification service continues to perform as expected,” according to a note to developers. “Providers that support both TLS and SSL 3.0 will not be affected and require no changes.”Google researchers revealed last week they found a flaw in SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) version 3.0, which was released more than 15 years ago. SSL has been replaced by TLS (Transport Layer Security), but the old versions are still used by some servers across the Internet and are supported by web browsers.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 10:15 pm

Xiaomi moving data outside China following privacy concerns

Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi is moving customer data and its Internet platforms to servers outside China, only months after the company apologized over privacy concerns.Since early this year, Xiaomi has been migrating the data as a way to “cut down latency and reduce failure rates” for its customers across the world, said company vice president Hugo Barra in an online post on Wednesday.“At the same time, it also better equips us to maintain high privacy standards and comply with local data protection regulations,” Barra added. “This is a very high priority for Xiaomi as we expand into new markets over the next few years.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 9:40 pm

At Austin airport, Wi-Fi predicts how long the security line will be

The Internet can ease travel concerns in many ways, including flight-delay information, maps of road congestion, and ride-sharing apps. But a Wi-Fi network at the Austin, Texas, airport can now answer one of the great unknowns: How long will I have to wait in line at security?That information is available thanks to fairly simple technology implemented on a Cisco Systems network run by global Wi-Fi provider Boingo Wireless. It’s an early example of how the so-called Internet of Things can make some parts of life easier.Austin-Bergstrom International Airport got the nation’s first airport Wi-Fi network in 2000, according to Boingo, which has run the airport’s Wi-Fi since 2008. Now it’s become one of the first airports to implement Passpoint, the standard that lets users of some devices get on networks and roam between them without entering a username and password. The Cisco network that supports Passpoint can also use location technologies for additional services.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 7:50 pm

Twitter weaves Fabric, but will developers be drawn in?

To identity Twitter solely as a micro-blogging service could be to do it a disservice. The company wants to be much more to developers building mobile apps, and at its Flight conference on Wednesday it welcomed them in.Twitter unveiled Fabric on Wednesday, a broad software development kit aimed at helping developers build, grow and monetize their mobile apps. It includes tools for crash reporting, app log-ins, embedding and sharing Twitter posts, and measuring ad effectiveness.The free SDK, more than a year in the making, could usher in a wave of rich apps with more tie-ins to Twitter. Its major components include Crashlytics, Twitter’s crash-reporting system; a tool called Digits that lets users log in with a phone number instead of a password; and easier ways to embed Twitter content in apps and post to Twitter across iOS and Android.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 7:40 pm

AT&T signed up 500,000 cars for its 4G network last quarter

AT&T signed up half a million cars to its 4G network between July and September, the result of deals with Audi and General Motors to connect cars and offer in-vehicle hotspots for riders.The carrier began offering 4G service for GM vehicles in June, with pricing beginning at $5 per month for 200MB of data.For that, the carrier estimates users can stream about 6.5 hours of music, 13 hours of web surfing or thousands of emails. Prices rise to $50 per month for up to 5GB, and one-off daily data passes are also available.The GM service is offered through its OnStar subsidiary. The 4G signal is delivered to passengers via a WiFi hotspot that can support up to seven devices, according to the auto maker. The hotspot extends a short distance beyond the vehicle so that passengers can access it when the car is parked and they’re nearby.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 6:00 pm

Government regulation on cloud security may spur SaaS use in health care

Governments may need to tighten the regulatory screws on SaaS vendors to make them be more transparent and forthcoming about their security practices.Until then, it will be hard for health care companies in particular to fully trust cloud software vendors, according to speakers at the EU-U.S. ehealth Marketplace and Conference in Boston on Wednesday.Depending on customers to audit cloud vendors to ensure that their security and privacy measures comply with U.S. government regulations on protecting sensitive data is inadequate, one of the speakers said.“The best we can do right now is a checklist,” said Chris Davis, a Verizon senior architect whose job entails ensuring that the company’s cloud services meet the data security regulations of various national governments. Technology, however, changes rapidly and checklists soon become dated, he said.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 4:05 pm

How Sony, Intel, and Unix made Apple's Mac a PC competitor

Mac shipments have grown to 5.5 million while the entire PC industry has remained stagnant. Counter to industry trends, Apple’s Mac has grown by 20% compared to the same quarter last year, according to IDC’s latest PC report. This comes in the face of the PC industry‘s quarterly decline of 1.7%.Apple’s fanatical insistence on creating its own hardware to run its software paid off. It should give credit to Sony, Intel, and Unix for the Mac’s performance. In 1991, Andrew Rapport declared Microsoft the winner in the PC contest because Microsoft and Intel had harnessed the Asian supply chain and dramatically undercut the cost of the eccentric Steve Jobs’s Apple Mac. Microsoft benefited from the network effect of the thousands of manufacturers that built parts and systems compatible with Windows that also saved the company billions in working capital that it would have otherwise had to invest to produce a Microsoft-branded PC. After publishing his findings in Computerless Computer Company in the Harvard Business Review, current venture capitalist Rappaport won the 1991 McKinsey award for the best HBR article. This was a long time ago, yes, but it illustrates how Apple changed its game plan over the last 30 years to compete with the PC.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 4:05 pm

Debian community splits over systemd, but fork still unlikely

The latest chapter in the ongoing furor over the software known as systemd threatens to split the Debian community, after a splinter group stated that it would create a fork of the well-known Linux distribution if systemd is included in an upcoming release. “We don't want to be forced to use systemd in substitution to the traditional UNIX sysvinit init, because systemd betrays the UNIX philosophy,” a group of unnamed “veteran UNIX admins” writes at the campaign’s website, debianfork.org. + ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Industry reacts to Cisco cutting stake in VCE, EMC taking control | Ubuntu turns 10: A look back at the desktop Linux standard bearer +To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 3:58 pm

OS X Yosemite tips and tricks you need to know

A seamless designImage by ShutterstockOS X Yosemite is Apple’s latest take on a desktop operating system, and seeing as how we’re living in an increasingly mobile world, it should come as no surprise that OS X Yosemite is designed to work seamlessly with iOS 8. As with any new major OS X update, Apple has added a plethora of new functionality. Here are some tips on tricks for making use of the cooler OS X Yosemite features.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Posted by on 22 October 2014 | 3:41 pm