GCC / LLVM edit/build/debug survey

You, blog readers, are kind enough to answer our surveys and often provide extended feedback through individual conversations. Continuing to depend on your feedback and kindness, we are sharing another survey : The purpose of this survey is to gain a greater understanding of developers using GCC and LLVM based compilers either targeting Windows or Linux. The end goal is to gain a better understanding of your IDE needs focused on editing, building, and debugging. There are 11 questions and should...(read more)

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 3:38 pm

Experiencing Data Access Issue in Azure Portal - 9/4 - Resolved

Final Update: Friday, 9/4/2015 20:02 UTC We are aware of issues within Application Insights which caused slower queries for the users.  Our logs show the incident started on 9/4, 18:40 UTC and that during the 20 mins that it took to resolve the issue 3% of customers experienced slower queries.The following data types are affected: Availability, Customer Event, Dependency, Exception, Metric, Page Load, Page View, Performance Counter, Request. The issue is resolved now. • Root Cause: The failure was due to a memory issue identified in our system • Lessons Learned: We are working to understand the cause of memory issue and work towards long term fix. • Incident Timeline:  20 minutes - 9/4, 18:40 UTC through 9/4, 19:00 UTC We understand that customers rely on Application Insights as a critical service and apologize for any impact this incident caused. -Application Insights Service Delivery Team

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 3:15 pm

Building Office 365 Applications with Node.js and the Azure AD v2 app model

Earlier today I authored a post on the new Azure AD v2 app model that converges the developer experience across consumer and commercial applications. The post outlines the key differences in the v2 app model and illustrates how to perform a manual OAuth flow with it. Most developers won’t have to perform this manual flow, because the Azure AD team is building authentication libraries (ADAL) to handle OAuth on most popular platforms. ADAL is a great accelerator for application developers working with Microsoft connected services. However, the lack of an ADAL library doesn’t prevent a platform from working in this new app model. In this post, I’ll share a Node.js application that doesn’t use any special libraries to perform OAuth in the v2 app model. (Please visit the site to view this video) NOTE: Node.js has an ADAL library, but wasn’t updated to support the v2 app model flows at the time of this post. The Azure AD team is working hard on an update Node.js library. The Outlook/Exchange team has published a sample that uses the simple-oauth2 library for Node.js authHelper.js The solution uses an authHelper.js file, containing application registration details (client id, client secret, reply URL, permission scopes, etc) and utility functions for interacting with Azure AD. The three primary utility functions are detailed below: getAuthUrl returns the authorization end-point in Azure AD with app details concatenated as URL parameters. The application can redirect to this end-point to initiate the first step of OAuth. getTokenFromCode returns an access token using the app registration details and a provided authorization code (that is returned to the application after user signs in and authorizes the app) getTokenFromRefreshToken returns an access token using the app registration details and a provided refresh token (that might come from cache) authHelper.js var https = require('https'); var appDetails = { authority: 'https://login.microsoftonline.com/common', client_id: '1d9e332b-6c7d-4554-8b51-d398fef5f8a7', client_secret: 'Y0tgHpYAy3wQ0eF9NPkMPOf', redirect_url: 'http://localhost:5858/login', scopes: 'openid+https://outlook.office.com/contacts.read+offline_access'}; //builds a redirect url based on app detailfunction getAuthUrl(res) { return appDetails.authority + '/oauth2/v2.0/authorize' +  '?client_id=' + appDetails.client_id +  '&scope=' + appDetails.scopes +  '&redirect_uri=' + appDetails.redirect_url +  '&response_type=code';}; //gets a token given an authorization codefunction getTokenFromCode(code, callback) { var payload = 'grant_type=authorization_code' +  '&redirect_uri=' + appDetails.redirect_url +  '&client_id=' + appDetails.client_id +  '&client_secret=' + appDetails.client_secret +  '&code=' + code +  '&scope=' + appDetails.scopes;  postJson('login.microsoftonline.com',   '/common/oauth2/v2.0/token',  payload,  function(token) {   callback(token);  });}; //gets a new token given a refresh tokenfunction getTokenFromRefreshToken(token, callback) { var payload = 'grant_type=refresh_token' +  '&redirect_uri=' + appDetails.redirect_url +  '&client_id=' + appDetails.client_id +  '&client_secret=' + appDetails.client_secret +  '&refresh_token=' + token +  '&scope=' + appDetails.scopes;  postJson('login.microsoftonline.com',   '/common/oauth2/v2.0/token',  payload,  function(token) {   callback(token);  });}; //performs a generic http POST and returns JSONfunction postJson(host, path, payload, callback) {  var options = {    host: host,     path: path,     method: 'POST',    headers: {       'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded',      'Content-Length': Buffer.byteLength(payload, 'utf8')    }  };   var reqPost = https.request(options, function(res) {    var body = '';    res.on('data', function(d) {      body += d;    });    res.on('end', function() {      callback(JSON.parse(body));    });    res.on('error', function(e) {      callback(null);    });  });    //write the data  reqPost.write(payload);  reqPost.end();}; exports.getAuthUrl = getAuthUrl;exports.getTokenFromCode = getTokenFromCode;exports.getTokenFromRefreshToken = getTokenFromRefreshToken;exports.TOKEN_CACHE_KEY = 'TOKEN_CACHE_KEY';   Application Routes The Node.js solution was built to using express and handlebars. Two routes handle the entire flow: Index Route If the user has a cached refresh token, use it to get a new token If the new token is valid, get and display data If the new token is invalid, send the user to login If the user doesn’t have a cached refresh token, send the user to login Login Route If the URL contains an authorization code, use it to get tokens If the token is valid, cache the refresh token and send the user back to index If the token is invalid, and error must have occurred If the URL doesn’t contain and authorization code, get the redirect URL for authorization and send user there Here is the JavaScript implementation of this. Route Controller Logic var express = require('express');var router = express.Router();var authHelper = require('../authHelper.js');var https = require('https'); /* GET home page. */router.get('/', function(req, res, next) {  if (req.cookies.TOKEN_CACHE_KEY === undefined)    res.redirect('/login');  else {    //get data    authHelper.getTokenFromRefreshToken(req.cookies.TOKEN_CACHE_KEY, function(token) {      if (token !== null) {        getJson('outlook.office.com', '/api/v1.0/me/contacts', token.access_token, function(contacts) {          if (contacts.error && contacts.error.code === 'MailboxNotEnabledForRESTAPI')            res.render('index', { title: 'My Contacts', contacts: [], restDisabled: true });          else            res.render('index', { title: 'My Contacts', contacts: contacts['value'], restDisabled: false });        });      }      else {        //TODO: handle error      }    });  }}); router.get('/login', function(req, res, next) {  //look for code from AAD reply  if (req.query.code !== undefined) {    //use the code to get a token    authHelper.getTokenFromCode(req.query.code, function(token) {      //check for null token      if (token !== null) {        res.cookie(authHelper.TOKEN_CACHE_KEY, token.refresh_token);        res.redirect('/');      }      else {        //TODO: handle error      }    });  }  else {    res.render('login', { title: 'Login', authRedirect: authHelper.getAuthUrl });    }}); //perform a fet based on parameters and return a JSON objectfunction getJson(host, path, token, callback) {  var options = {    host: host,     path: path,     method: 'GET',    headers: {       'Content-Type': 'application/json',      'Accept': 'application/json',      'Authorization': 'Bearer ' + token    }  };   https.get(options, function(res) {    var body = '';    res.on('data', function(d) {      body += d;    });    res.on('end', function() {      callback(JSON.parse(body));    });    res.on('error', function(e) {      callback(null);    });  });}; module.exports = router;   Conclusion Authentication libraries make great solution accelerators, but certainly aren’t necessary to leverage the Azure AD v2 app model or consume Microsoft connected services. You can get the full Node.js solution on GitHub using the link below: Sample use in Bloghttps://github.com/OfficeDev/Contacts-API-NodeJS-AppModelV2 Outlook/Exchange Team Samplehttps://dev.outlook.com/RestGettingStarted/Tutorial/node

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 3:13 pm

How to win a hackathon talk, Penn Apps 2015

Here is the slide deck that I used during my Penn Apps 2015 talk this weekend. During this talk, I illustrate how the teams I was on at two Fortune 50 companies, Comcast & Microsoft, both won hackathons, and some tools of the trade. I also point you towards a number of starter projects and… The post How to win a hackathon talk, Penn Apps 2015 appeared first on Dave Voyles | Tech Evangelist at Microsoft ....(read more)

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 2:43 pm

Small Basic: Timer - Featured Article

Our Small Basic Guru Gold Medal Winner from July was...    Small Basic Technical Guru - July 2015     Nonki Takahashi Small Basic: Timer Michiel Van Hoorn: "Great article on how to control "time" in your Small Basic projects" RZ: "Timer is not an easy subject to grasp. Nonki did a very good job simplifying that."   Ed Price - MSFT Small Basic Sample: Nesting Subroutines RZ: "Excellent explanation of the concept of nesting!"    Ed Price - MSFT Small Basic Sample: The Triangle Area Calculator RZ: "Very good walkthrough of the program."   Nonki's Small Basic: Timer!    The article is about the Timer object in Microsoft's Small Basic programming language.   It's one of those short and sweet articles that's a fantastic resource. Although short, it's also thorough, right down to the related resource links!   Here's the... Table of Contents What is a Timer Timer Object   Properties Events Operations   Event Handler Sample Programs Known Issues   Error (Delay) Short Interval is Heavy in Remote   See Also Other Resources   Special thanks to Nonki for the contribution!   Check out the article here: Small Basic: Timer   Have a great week, everyone!  Small and Basically yours,    - Ninja Ed

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 1:42 pm

Win2D / ANGLE team engineering process

Attached to the wall outside my office:  

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 12:12 pm

Working with the converged Azure AD v2 app model

Microsoft recently announced the public preview of a new application model that offers a unified developer experience across Microsoft consumer and commercial services. This is so significant it is being called the “V2” application model. Why is it so significant? Now a single application definition and OAuth flow can be used for consumer services (ex: OneDrive, Outlook.com, etc) AND commercial services in Office 365 (ex: Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Business). In this post, I’ll outline the major differences in the v2 app model and how to perform a basic OAuth flow using it. (Please visit the site to view this video) What’s Different Registering applications and performing OAuth have become common practices when building applications that connect to Microsoft services. However, the new converged “V2” app model brings some significant changes to both of these tasks. I have listed the major differences below, but you should also read the announcement by the Azure Active Directory team. Unified Applications – V2 Apps converge the disparate application definitions that exist today between Microsoft Accounts (MSA) that are used for consumer services and Azure AD (AAD) accounts that are used for Office 365. By offering one unified application, developers can register apps from a centralized portal (https://apps.dev.microsoft.com) that work with either MSA or AAD accounts. One App, Multiple Platforms – V2 Apps support multiple platforms within a single application definition. In the past, multiple application definitions were required to deliver web and mobile experiences. In V2 apps, both web and mobile experiences can be delivered from the same application definition. Permissions at Runtime – V2 apps don’t declare permissions during app registration. Instead, they request permission dynamically by providing a scope parameter in token requests. Deferred Resources – V2 apps no longer pass a resource parameter to get resource-specific access tokens. Instead, the resource can be automatically determined by the service based on the scopes passed in.  Refresh Tokens by Request – V2 apps do not automatically get refresh tokens when requesting tokens from the service. Instead, you must explicitly request a refresh token by using the offline_access permission scope in the request a token. Performing OAuth There are a number of OAuth flows that the V2 model supports. I’m going to walk through the OAuth2 Authorization Code Flow, which is the most popular and used in most web applications. To demonstrate the flow, I’m going to take the raw browser/fiddler approach popularized by Rob Howard and Chakkaradeep “Chaks” Chandran blogged about HERE. The OAuth2 Authorization Code Flow can be simplified into these simple steps: Redirect the user to an authorize URL in Azure AD with some app details, including the URL Azure should reply back with an authorization code once the user logs in and consents the application. Post additional app details (including the authorization code from Step 1) to a token end-point in Azure AD to get an access token. Include the access token from Step 2 in the header when calling services secured by the V2 app model. Sounds simple enough right? The Azure Active Directory Authentication Libraries (ADAL) make this flow simple on a number of platforms, but I find it very helpful to understand the flow ADAL manages. Let’s perform this flow using nothing but a browser and Fiddler (any web request editor will work in place of Fiddler). Step 0 – Register the V2 Application Before we can perform an OAuth flow, we need to register a new V2 application in the new registration portal. Open a browser and navigate to https://apps.dev.microsoft.com. Sign in with either a Microsoft Account (MSA) such as outlook.com/live.com/hotmail.com or an Azure AD account you use for Office 365. Once you are signed in, click the Add an app button in the upper right. Give the application a name and click Create application. Once the application is provisioned, copy the Application Id somewhere where it will be readily available for the next section. Next, generate a new application password by clicking the Generate New Password button in the Application Secrets section. When the password is displayed, copy it down for use in the next section. Warning: this is the only time the app registration portal will display the password. Next, locate the Platforms section and click Add Platform to launch the Add Platform dialog. Select Web for the application type. Notice that the V2 application model supports multiple platforms in the same application. Finally, update the Redirect URI of the new platform to https://localhost and save your changes by clicking the Save button at the bottom of the screen. The V2 application should be ready to use! Step 1 – Get Authorization Code The first step of the OAuth2 Authorization Code Flow is to redirect the user to an authorize URL in Azure AD with some app details, including the URL Azure should reply back with an authorization code once the user logs in and consents the application. The format of this authorize URL is listed below. Replace the placeholders with details from your app registration and paste the entire URI into your browser. NOTE: The authorize URI uses the new v2.0 end-point versioning. It also uses the scope parameter to tell the authorize flow what permissions the application is requesting (aka – Runtime Permissions). Here we are requesting openid (sign-in), https://outlook.office.com/contacts.read (read access to contacts), and offline_access (required to get refresh tokens back for long-term access).   Authorize URI https://login.microsoftonline.com/common/oauth2/v2.0/authorize?client_id={paste your client id}&scope=openid+https://outlook.office.com/contacts.read+offline_access&redirect_uri={paste your reply url}&response_type=code   Immediately after pasting the authorization URI into the browser, the user should be directed to a login screen. Here, they can provide either a consumer account (MSA) or an Azure AD account (if an MSA account is provided, the login screen change) Azure AD Sign-in MSA Sign-in       Once the user signs in, they will be asked to grant consent for the permissions the application is requesting. This consent screen will only display the first time through this flow. The screen will look a little different based on the type of account provided. Azure AD Grant Consent MSA Grant Consent       After granting consent to the application, the browser will be redirected to the location specified in the redirect_uri parameter. However, the authorization flow will include a code URL parameter as part of this redirect. This is your authorization code and completes this section! Step 2 – Get Access Token After acquiring the authorization code with the help of the user (logging in and granting consent) you can get an access token silently. To do this, POST additional app details (including the authorization code, application password, and permission scopes) to a token end-point in Azure AD. To perform the POST, you need a web request editor such as Fiddler or Postman. The end-point, headers, and body are listed below, but make sure you replace the placeholders with details from your app registration. NOTE: The token end-point also uses the new v2.0 end-point versioning. The POST body also uses the same scope parameters you used to get the authorization code.   Get Access Token with Authorization Code Method: POST ----------------------------------------------------------End-Point: https://login.microsoftonline.com/common/oauth2/v2.0/token ---------------------------------------------------------- Headers: Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded ---------------------------------------------------------- Body: grant_type=authorization_code &redirect_uri={paste your reply url} &client_id={paste your client id} &client_secret={paste your client secret} &code={paste authorization code from previous step} &scope=openid+https://outlook.office.com/contacts.read+offline_access   Here I’m using Fiddler’s Composer to perform the POST to get an access token. The response to this POST should include both an access token and refresh token (because we included the offline_access scope). Step 3 – Call Service with Access Token  Congratulations…you have an access token, which is your key to calling services secured by the V2 application model. For the initial preview, only Outlook.com/Exchange Online services support this new flow. However, Microsoft is working hard deliver widespread support for this flow, so other popular services will become available very soon. For Outlook.com/Exchange Online, we can hit one API end-point and the service will determine which mail platform to use based on the token provided. Use an MSA account and the API will automatically go against Outlook.com. Use an AAD Account and the API will automatically hit Exchange Online in Office 365. It’s magic! You can call a service in Outlook.com/Exchange Online using the web request editor. Use the REST end-point and headers below to GET contacts for the user. The header has a placeholder that should be replaced with the access_token acquired in the previous section.  Calling Outlook.com/Exchange Online REST API Method: GET---------------------------------------------------------- End-Point: https://outlook.office.com/api/v1.0/me/contacts ---------------------------------------------------------- Headers: Accept:application/json Content-Type:application/json Authorization: Bearer {access_token from previous step}   GET Composer GET Response       NOTE: There are millions of MSA around the world and not all of them have been migrated to support this flow. Microsoft is working hard to migrate all MSA accounts, but it won’t happen overnight. If your MSA account hasn’t been migrated, you will get a 404 response querying contacts with the following error: {"error":{"code":"MailboxNotEnabledForRESTAPI","message":"REST API is not yet supported for this mailbox."}}   Conclusion App Unification…OAuth Unification…End-Point Unification…goodness all around! I’ll be posting an actual code sample in the next few days, so check back soon. Below is a raw text file with the calls used in this post: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/richdizz/Azure-AD-v2-Authorization-Code-Flow/master/OAuthRaw.txt

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 12:07 pm

From Office UI Fabric to Office IT Scripts

Hi, This is the right time to start blogging again about Office and Windows. Just with the recent announcement of SharePoint Server 2016 Preview, and all things rolling out from Office 365, plus Windows 10 innovation next year will be awesome :). I wanted to highlight two initiatives that came out this summer: Office UI Fabric is a responsive, mobile-first, front-end framework for developers, designed to make it simple to quickly create web experiences using the Office Design Language. Think about it as your framework to build Office Add-ins and Apps, no matter your platform. (remember coming cross-platform add-ins were announced at \\build). This will bring you: Common Style in your solutions aligned with Office across platforms Reusable components to use and bind (a nice list is at https://github.com/OfficeDev/Office-UI-Fabric/blob/master/ghdocs/COMPONENTS.md ) Check the resources available! Design guidelines for Office Add-ins GitHub Repo Office UI Fabric with SourceCode and Documentation Office 365 JavaScript controls For the management/devops part :), the Office IT Pro Deployment Script project, is a new driven community GitHub project were you can contribute in a collection of PowerShell scripts focus on simplifying IT activities. A gem there is Office Click-To-Run Configuration XML Editor a web based editor that allows you to graphically generate and edit the configuration file used with Office Click-To-Run deployments. Of Course this is an extension to the existing Powershell Repository that you should chek out as well                     So check the repo, use it, give feedback and contribute! Bye!

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 11:43 am

Kostenloses Windows 10 Education für Schüler und Studierende

Bildungsinstitutionen können ihren Schülerinnen und Schülern bzw. Studierenden ab sofort Windows 10 Education ohne zusätzliche Kosten zur Verfügung stellen. Voraussetzung für die Nutzung des Windows Student Use Benefit Programms ist, dass die Institution Windows in einem qualifizierten Microsoft Volumenlizenzprogramm lizenziert (Microsoft Enrolment for Education Solution Program [EES] oder Microsoft Open Value Subscription – Education Solutions Vereinbarung [OVS-ES] wie z.B. der FWU-Vertrag für das Schulwesen).Windows 10 Education kann auf privaten PCs während der Schul- und Studienzeit und darüber hinaus auch nach dem Schul-/Studienabschluss benutzt werden. Falls gewünscht, können Schulen bestimmte Attribute der PCs über die Schul-Domäne verwalten.Das Windows Student Use Benefit Programm wird weltweit vom Microsoft Partner Kivuto vertrieben. Als Teil der Microsoft Lizenz, für die die Bildungsinstitution bereits bezahlt, erhält diese innerhalb von zwei Werktagen einen ELMS-WebStore, der mit der jeweils gewünschten Authentifizierungsmethode eingerichtet wird. Der gesamte Prozess ist automatisiert, kostenlos und über Telefon und E-Mail erreichbar. Zusätzlich gibt es ein Selbsthilfe-Portal für Kunden, in dem die wichtigsten Fragen beantwortet werden.Das Einrichten ist ganz einfach:- Melden Sie sich über das Kontaktformular auf Kivutu-Webseite an. Es wird dann geprüft, ob Sie für dieses Programm berechtigt sind.- Nach Bestätigung Ihrer Berechtigung richtet Kivutu Ihnen den auf Sie zugeschnittenen und automatisierten Webshop ein, über den Sie Windows 10 Education an Ihre Schülerinnen und Schüler bzw. Studierenden verteilen können. Falls Ihre Schule bereits einen Kivuto Webshop hat, können wird Windows 10 Education einfach hinzugefügt.- Danach können Sie Ihren Lernenden mitteilen, dass sie Windows 10 Education im Webshop kostenfrei bestellen können. Jeder Schüler/Student bekommt einen eigenen Produktschlüssel und Zugang zum Download von Windows 10 Education.Der Windows Student Use Benefit komplettiert zusammen mit dem Student Advantage Benefit das Bemühen von Microsoft, Schüler und Studenten mit aktueller Software bei Ihrer Ausbildung zu unterstützen – ganz ohne Zusatzkosten. Der Student Advantage Benefit ermöglicht es Schülern und Studenten, Office 365 ProPlus für bis zu 5 Geräte sowie für bis zu 5 weitere mobile Geräte (Windows Tablet, iPad) einfach über das Selbstservice Portal herunterzuladen: www.office.com/student.Mehr Informationen zum gesamten Bildungsangebot von Microsoft finden Sie unter www.microsoft.de/besserlernen.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 10:46 am

Monitoring your SQL Database in Azure

Log into the Azure management portal http://manage.windowsazure.com Select your SQL Database that you interested in getting details on. Select monitor Let’s say you want to monitor your DTU %.  Click on that line item. Select ADD RULE Name the rule and describe it Specify who you want to receive the alerts.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 10:44 am

General Availability of Work Item Trend and Rollup Reporting in Power BI

Today, a few short weeks after our initial release of the work item reporting capabilities in the Visual Studio Online Power BI Connector, we are happy to announce the general availability of trend and rollup reporting capabilities. Starting today you can do things like create sprint burndown charts based on story points, effort, size or remaining work. These capabilities let you trend any data in the model over time. The rollup capability allows you to provide summary counts of work items in different states under epics, features, or stories. With rollup counts you can get a count of estimated, completed, or remaining work,. The following example shows a count of tasks by state for each of the user stories under their parent features. With the release of these capabilities we have redone the out of the box report to provide a more complete view of your data including a new Open Bug Status report page with bug trends: If you haven’t tried out the Power BI reporting features, give it a try now – it’s free! Instructions on getting started can be found here. Please note that you will need to re-create your connection to Visual Studio Online in order to take advantage of the new model – models will not upgrade in place. Help documentation can be found here for these two new features: https://msdn.microsoft.com/Library/vs/alm/Report/powerbi/create-trend-charts https://msdn.microsoft.com/Library/vs/alm/Report/powerbi/create-rollup-charts Additional documentation will be released next week detailing the model and some anomalies people may experience because of the model design. As always, feedback is welcome – either on the new capabilities or on the new help documentation. Thanks, Jeff Levinson

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 10:21 am

Azure AD Object Attribute Uniqueness

You're a cloud engineer. You're organized, methodical, and thorough in your approach to the integration of your cloud deployment with your existing on-premises workloads. By now, you've successfully deployed DirSync for your organization and federated your Active Directory up to the cloud. Not only that but you've been in the game long enough, you've upgraded from DirSync to AD Sync, and now to Azure AD Connect – and you made it look easy. You have hundreds, if not thousands of users that utilize and rely on the products you support. Your skills as an administrator enable your business to be nimble, your users to be productive, and your career to be blazing a path into the Azure sky! Sounds like you, right? I thought it might. After all, you are my target audience for today’s post! While my primary focus is supporting Microsoft Azure, I sometimes work on Exchange Online and Office 365, as both ExO and O365 utilize Azure AD! I ran into a very interesting problem a few weeks back that I think deserves mention. Perhaps this post may help others in the same situation. Within each Azure AD tenant, every User, Group, and Contact object has the following four attributes: UPN, proxyAddresses, TargetAddress, and Mail. There are more, but we’re going to focus on just these four. Why? These four attributes on each object must have unique values amongst all other objects. Wait, what? That doesn’t mean that your UPN and Mail attributes can’t be the same on a single object, but that these attribute values may not overlap between two objects. One object’s UPN attribute cannot match the contents of another’s proxyAddresses attribute, and so on. Any overlap will result in export errors seen within the Synchronization Service Manager on the Azure AD Connector. I know that last paragraph was somewhat difficult to follow. The best way to explain this is to actually demonstrate what I’m talking about. Let’s use this example for reference: I am Jimmie L. Lightner, III. Yes, my father and grandfather are named Jimmie as well. If you think this is confusing, try being one of us during a holiday get together!  Let’s create three user accounts in our on-premises Active Directory, one for each of us. Active Directory will force us to each have a unique userName as seen in the following screen shot. I've created 'Jim' for my Grandpa, 'JimmieL' for my Dad, and 'Jimmie' for myself.    My account is updated to contain my organizational email address, jimmie@homeroot.net, in the Mail attribute of my User Object. This change will be synchronized to Azure AD successfully.   Later on, my grandfather's proxyAddresses attribute is updated to include the same SMTP address as my Mail attribute.   Our on-premises Active Directory does not care that my Mail and Grandpa’s proxyAddresses attribute values overlap with each other, but this is a problem when we’re synchronizing to an Azure AD tenant. Shortly after the change to grandpa's User Object is brought into the Metaverse via the Active Directory Connector, it will fail to be exported to Azure AD.  If we look at the Synchronization Service Manager console, we will see export errors on our Windows Azure Active Directory Connector.   Clicking on the hyperlink in the error report will bring up the Object Properties within the Connector Space. Here we can see that our Pending Export is trying to add the proxyAddresses value to Grandpa's User Object in Azure AD, resulting in a collision.     I have yet to find documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for these attributes to be unique, but the below article gives us several methods that will enable us to track down the Object with which we're colliding if we do encounter this error.  KB2643629 One or more objects don't sync when using the Azure Active Directory Sync tool I hope that you found this post helpful and informative. If you have any questions, please feel free to post them in the comments! Thank you for reading! Until next time, Jimmie.  

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 9:00 am

Using an intermediate library to make the main library retargetable

A customer was developing a static library targetting both Windows XP Win32 applications and universal Windows apps. (This was before Windows XP reached end-of-life.) Our library uses critical sections, but unfortunately there is no version Initialize­Critical­Section that is available to both Windows XP Win32 applications and universal Windows apps. Universal Windows apps must use Initialize­Critical­Section­Ex, but that function is not available to Windows XP Win32 applications. Is there a way to dynamically target both Windows XP Win32 applications and universal Windows apps, pass WACK validation, and still have one library? We thought we could use Get­Module­Handle and Get­Proc­Address to detect which platform we are one, but Get­Module­Handle is not allowed in universal Windows apps, so we're back where we started. Are we stuck having two versions of our library, one for Windows XP Win32 applications and one for universal Windows apps? Runtime dynamic linking (Load­Library, Get­Proc­Address) is not permitted in universal Windows apps, which means that for universal Windows apps, you must have an entry for Initialize­Critical­Section­Ex in your import table. But if that function is in your input table, then it won't load on Windows XP. (You might think that you could have a second library to be used by Windows XP clients that implements the Initialize­Critical­Section­Ex function. Unfortunately, you will run afoul of dllimport.) You are going to have to have separate libraries at some point, but you don't have to have two versions of your library. You could build your library to call, say, Contoso­Initialize­Critical­Section, and have two helper libraries, one for Windows XP Win32 applications and one for universal Windows apps, each of which implement the Contoso­Initialize­Critical­Section function in a manner appropriate to the target. In other words, people targeting Windows XP would link to ContosoCore.dll and ContosoXPSupport.dll. People writing universal Windows apps would link to ContosoCore.dll and ContosoStoreSupport.dll. This approach has a few advantages: It's simple, works (because it's so simple), and everybody understands it. All the files in your core library need to be compiled only once. The second clause pays off if your library is large, or if you need to add new operating system targets.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 9:00 am

Supplying Run Time Parameters to Tests

Tests broadly classified as integration tests or functional tests are often in need to connect to external app resource (web application, API front end, or a DB tier) to drive validations. Maintaining lifecycle of such tests from the environment where it’s authored (dev machine with VS) to all the other places where they might be consumed (as part of Build/CI Tests, Build-Deploy-Test workflow, Release workflow) is quite challenging. As a classic example, consider following piece of functional validation code:     To effectively reuse such tests throughout the lifecycle it’s important that we provide tooling flexibility for connecting tests to external app resources such as appUrl in the example above. In Visual Studio 2015, the TestRunParameters section in RunSettings file is defined to address this need.     This value can then be used in tests using TestContext.Properties. Currently, this functionality is only available in MSTest framework.      For CI, BDT and Release workflows, we have added the ability to override the value of parameters declared in the runsettings file with those supplied at runtime. These values can be passed to the Visual Studio Test task or Visual Studio Test using Test Agent task using the Override TestRun Parameters field.   Figure 1: Specifying value of appUrl in the VSTest task   So as to not hardcode the value in the task itself, you can declare a Build variable and then use that at all places in the workflow where you need it.   Figure 2: Declaring "Deployment URL" as a Build variable     Figure 3: Using variable in ‘Visual Studio Test using Test Agent’ task for a BDT workflow  

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 8:23 am

Achievement For All offering Enchanted Kingdom learning workshops at October conference

Over the course of this year, regular readers of this blog will have read about the BBC Earth 3D nature film Enchanted Kingdom, and the accompanying learning resources. The following blog post is written by Professor Sonia Blandford, Founder and CEO of Achievement for All, a movement focussed on educational change, and looks ahead to the organisation’s project based learning initiatives using the Enchanted Kingdom, as well as October’s National Conference. --- As CEO of a charity dedicated to ensuring the academic progress of every child, regardless of the background they come from, the challenges they face, or the needs they may have, I am always looking out for new ways of engaging pupils with teaching and learning. At Achievement for All we know not every child learns in the same way, or at the same pace, and that as educators we must broaden the horizons of the classroom if we are to ensure every child achieves what they should. And that’s why Project Based Learning is so exciting, and why we leapt at the opportunity to work with Microsoft and the BBC by sharing the resources that accompany Enchanted Kingdom. We are encouraging our students and teachers to take the learning journey that surrounds “the most ambitious 3D nature film ever made” together. All Achievement for All settings will have access to the unique resources that accompany the film via The Bubble, our online hub for knowledge, information, and tools. We love how each lesson provides a journey to a specific learning objective but allows the class teacher the flexibility to adjust tasks on the basis of age and ability. Project based learning is a dynamic approach to teaching and learning, which enables pupils to explore real-world problems and challenges over a sustained period of time, just like those faced by the wildlife in the Enchanted Kingdom. Learners, regardless of challenge, need or disadvantage will be inspired through individual and group activities that develop creativity, innovation, understanding and skills. The Achievement for All National Conference 2015 We would encourage anyone wanting to find out a bit more about how this might work in school to join us at our annual National Conference at the NEC in Birmingham on the 7th October where we will be demonstrating the impact the Enchanted Kingdom experience is having on those who have been working with it for the last few months, and giving you the chance to see its wonders first hand via our workshops. This is far more than just a set of resources. At Achievement for All we believe that through using the project specific software and group activities, learners will actively engage with each other, whether it’s to explore and create gardens, write poetry, or delve inside volcanoes! And children will not only increase their awareness of the environment, but also gain in confidence when using enabling technologies. I have no doubt the Enchanted Kingdom will boost the learning experiences of Achievement for All children and young people. --- Enchanted Kingdom takes audiences on a journey of discovery through the wilds of Africa. It is narrated by Idris Elba, star of The Wire, Luther and Oscar-nominated Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. The movie brings together cutting edge 3D technology, Hollywood production expertise and the best nature film making to bring to life the incredible wonders, stories and characters of our planet.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 8:00 am

2015 年 8 月 SQL Server 最新モジュール

2015 年 8月18日 時点の SQL Server 最新モジュールです。 SQL Server 2000 は 2013 年 4 月 9 日に延長サポートが終了しました。長らくのご愛用ありがとうございました。 SQL Server 2008 は 2014 年 7 月 8 日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。   サービス パック 更新プログラム バージョン リリース年月 SQL Server 2014 SP1 KB 3075950 (CU2) 12.00.4422.0 2015/8 メインストリームサポート SQL Server 2012 SP2 KB 3072100 (CU7) 11.0.5623.0 2015/7 メインストリームサポート SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 無し 10.50.6000.34 2014/9 延長サポート ※2014年7月8日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。 SQL Server 2008 SP4 無し 10.0.6000.29 2014/10 延長サポート ※2014年7月8日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。 SQL Server 2005 SP4 KB 2598903 (OD) KB 2716427 Reporting Services (MS12-070) 9.00.5295 9.00.5324 2011/8 2012/10 延長サポート (2016/4/12 終了) RTM : Release To Manufacturing (製品出荷版) SP : Service Pack (サービスパック) CU : Cumulative Update (隔月リリースの累積更新プログラム) OD : On-Demand (オンデマンドリリースの累積更新プログラム) SQL Server の更新プログラムの詳細については、SQL Server の更新プログラムを参照して下さい。 メインストリームサポート、延長サポートについては、マイクロソフトサポートライフサイクルを参照して下さい。

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 7:26 am

2015 年 7 月 SQL Server 最新モジュール

2015 年 7月21日 時点の SQL Server 最新モジュールです。 SQL Server 2000 は 2013 年 4 月 9 日に延長サポートが終了しました。長らくのご愛用ありがとうございました。 SQL Server 2008 は 2014 年 7 月 8 日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。   サービス パック 更新プログラム バージョン リリース年月 SQL Server 2014 SP1 KB 3067839 (CU1) 12.00.4416.0 2015/6 メインストリームサポート SQL Server 2012 SP2 KB 3072100 (CU7) 11.0.5623.0 2015/7 メインストリームサポート SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 無し 10.50.6000.34 2014/9 延長サポート ※2014年7月8日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。 SQL Server 2008 SP4 無し 10.0.6000.29 2014/10 延長サポート ※2014年7月8日にメインストリームサポートが終了しました。 SQL Server 2005 SP4 KB 2598903 (OD) KB 2716427 Reporting Services (MS12-070) 9.00.5295 9.00.5324 2011/8 2012/10 延長サポート (2016/4/12 終了) RTM : Release To Manufacturing (製品出荷版) SP : Service Pack (サービスパック) CU : Cumulative Update (隔月リリースの累積更新プログラム) OD : On-Demand (オンデマンドリリースの累積更新プログラム) SQL Server の更新プログラムの詳細については、SQL Server の更新プログラムを参照して下さい。 メインストリームサポート、延長サポートについては、マイクロソフトサポートライフサイクルを参照して下さい。

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 7:23 am

The Field Notebook for Data Science

I mentioned in my previous post that I'm learning to work as an "Amateur Data Scientist", and I'm sharing my learning here on this site. I'm formatting my entries as a series of Field Notes, in the (more or less) formal sense. I'm taking the information I have found here: http://instruct.uwo.ca/biology/320y/fj.html and fitting that into the style for learning the discipline of Data Science. A Field Journal, or Field Notebook, is often used in the domain of biology. While we'll be studying biological data from time to time in our journey, the format isn't a 1:1 fit for the domain of computer science. Even so, I'll stretch the format a bit for us to use. So this is how you'll see the entries on this site: What, Why, How This type of entry will most often explain a tool or process. For instance, I'll cover the R data processing programming language and use those headings: What it is, Why you would use it, and How it works. Journal A Journalentry is a narrative diary of daily operations, including the environment the scientist works in. These entries explain a practical application of Data Science, with as much as I'm allowed to reveal about the situation I'm in when I document it. I don't use company or organization names in any case, and most often I'll "fuzz" the data and details so that I don't betray a confidence, but I will explain some real-world examples of how I put what I learn to good use. Species Accounts This type of entry in biology is a running list of notes of observations of selected species. Although I could make some pithy comment about co-workers or other folks, I'll resist that urge and use this type of entry to talk about the various products and technologies in a listing fashion. This is meant to change, and yet show history as well. For instance, I'll explain the ecostructure of "Big Data" tools, or perhaps the lineage of a technology for processing statistics. I will also include references to statistics itself, showing the "families" of calculations you can use to solve various problems. Catalog A Catalog entry in biology is a systematic and sequential list with reference numbers. In this site I'll use this type of entry to show a list of links to various subjects, where you can find more about them, and so on. All of these entries will be "living" - meaning I will endeavor to go back and update them as the information changes. I could use your help with that - add a comment when you find new or interesting information. I'll be rather regular with this blog, updating it at least once a month, and probably much more often - especially at the beginning. Comments, questions and thoughts are always welcomed.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 7:06 am

I am Data Science, and You can Too!

My Progression and My Passion I’ve been working in Information Technology for about 30 years. I started here at Microsoft a few years ago working on SQL Server in the Product Team, then went into the field as a technical professional on SQL Server, and when Microsoft Azure - at the time called “Red Dog” - came out, I jumped to that very early. After that, I worked in the Microsoft Azure Worldwide Team for one of the CTO’s. About a year ago, I left corporate headquarters and started working with all of our products in an architect role for the Department of Defense here in the U.S. in Microsoft Consulting Services. It’s been amazing – getting my hands quite dirty in the deployment and operation of lots of different technologies. But that meant I went dark on being so…open. And now I’m back. Back in the data profession, back on social media, and back on conferences where I can talk about what I do. I’m in an area dealing with “Data Science”. And I was a little nervous about the title of “Data Scientist” – I still don’t apply that to myself. However… Of Telescopes and Famous (and not so famous) People Years ago, science was done by average folks. Well, perhaps not average folks, but certainly by people without a formal degree in the topic they were enthused about, and people who had jobs doing something else. These people were called “Backyard Scientists” because they were sometimes involved in astronomy, done in their backyard, at night. Later, this term changed to “Amateur Scientists”. While not formally educated and employed in their subjects, they made significant contributions here and there (documenting for the first time the process of photosynthesis, using satellites for telecommunication, the laws of electrical induction to name but a few) and you may recognize a few of them: Arthur C. Clarke, Michael Faraday, Thomas Jefferson and a few others. Titles There’s been quite a bit of chatter lately about “Data Scientists” – what that means, who can claim the title, and so on. I’ve debated this topic already, so I won’t belabor that here. However, I believe that each of us inhabits a world of data, and many of us are employed in that domain of Information Technology. We carry titles such as Database Administrator, Database Developer, and Business Intelligence Professional, among others. As time and technology has progressed, the original data domains of mathematics and statistics are now colliding with the areas of Data Mining and Business Intelligence, creating a new professional – the Data Scientist. I describe this new professional as a statistician that knows too much about programming and business or a data professional that knows too much about statistics. In any case, there is still some confusion about the title. So I’ll sidestep the issue. Let’s all be comfortable with doing the work without a formal title. I don’t have a four-year math or stats degree – mine is in other areas. Math doesn’t come easy for me – I have to fight it to understand it well. But like you, I have a passion for the application of data to solve problems. I’ve got a lot to learn (thank goodness) and as I do, I’ll share that here, in a sort of “Field Notebook” about the topics I study. I’ll be an Amateur Data Scientist. And you can too! He’s baaaaack…. I’ve now returned to the Data area at Microsoft – or at least I will be, in a couple of weeks. I’ve started in a role on the team that deals with Advanced Analytics, which includes everything from Relational Databases to Machine Learning, the R programming language, and more. I’m excited to be back in a data-focused role again. As I learn these new ways of working with data, I invite you to join me here from time to time as I share what I learn. I’m not a statistician, machine learning expert, or even very exceptional at maths – but I plan to learn. As I do I’ll share what I find out, and how I learned it. I’d love to hear back from you as well – I think we can all learn from each other. I look forward to seeing you on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. I’ll see you at conferences, web broadcasts and more. I can’t wait to see what we learn together. Let’s get started. Contact Info My main site is here: http://buckwoody.com/ My University of Washington teaching site is here: http://faculty.washington.edu/woodyg/ LinkedIn (business updates only): https://www.linkedin.com/in/buckwoody Facebook (friends and family, random thoughts and pictures): https://www.facebook.com/BuckWoody Twitter (stream of consciousness, all bets are off on what I say): https://twitter.com/BuckWoodyMSFT Previous Azure Blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/buckwoody/

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 7:04 am

Microsoft заканчивает поддержку шифра RC4 в Microsoft Edge и Internet Explorer 11

С начала 2016 года, шифр RC4 будет отключен по умолчанию, и не будут использоваться в протоколах TLS. Сложилось общее мнение, что RC4 больше не безопасен. С нами солидарны Google и Mozilla, заканчивающие поддержку RC4 в Chrome и Firefox. Что такое RC4? RC4 - потоковый шифр, который был впервые написан в 1987 году, и широко поддерживался различными веб-браузерами. Современные атаки показали, что RC4 может быть взломан в течение нескольких часов или дней. В феврале 2015 года, эти новые нападения побудили Internet Engineering Task Force запретить использование RC4. RC4 будет полностью отключен по умолчанию для всех пользователей Microsoft Edge и Internet Explorer на Windows 7, Windows 8.1 и Windows 10, с начала 2016 года. К чему нужно быть готовым? Ожидается, что большинство пользователей не заметят этого изменения. Процент веб-служб, которые поддерживают только RC4, как известно, мал и сокращается. Но все же если ваш веб-сервис работает на RC4, вам нужно будет принять меры. С 2013 года, компания Microsoft рекомендует клиентам использовать протоколы TLS 1.2 в своих сервисах и не использовать шифр RC4.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 6:13 am

How Launchpad is Helping to #UpgradeYourWorld

There’s a vast difference between a shelter and a home. A home is where we feel safe, secure and nurtured – yes, a place to keep out the cold and rain, but also one that lights the fire that drives out darkness. Launchpad Reading’s mission is to provide more than shelter: they provide a home. Launchpad Reading provides housing with support to 111 people who have a history of homelessness, as well as support services to a further 200 people in their own accommodation. Launchpad also focuses on the conditions that so often surround or compound homelessness; such as mental illness, alcohol and substance abuse, poor nutrition and unemployment. It also helps those impacted by homelessness: helping to repair fractured relationships between Launchpad clients and their loved-ones. Reading is home to Microsoft UK HQ, and we wanted to do something for a local charity. Launchpad have been in Reading a little longer than we have, helping some of the town’s most vulnerable and disadvantaged people turn their lives around. It is this that makes Launchpad Reading such a perfect partner for Microsoft in our global initiative, Upgrade your World. This year-long project celebrates people and organisations doing great things, including partnerships with 10 global and 100 local charities, 10 of which are in the UK. Each charity will receive $50,000 each (roughly £33,000). Launchpad Reading is looking to use this funding to support digital inclusion work with their clients; for example, by making Wi-Fi available within their accommodation and at the Launchpad offices. “While many people take access to the internet for granted, its role in the lives of our clients is truly transformational.” says Ian Caren, Launchpad Reading CEO. “It allows them to search for jobs, learn new skills, find vital health information, and connect with a support network they wouldn’t have access to otherwise.” At Microsoft, we’re passionate about empowering people, something which is clearly at the heart of Launchpad’s work too. “Launchpad sees the potential in people, and provide tailored support to help them build better futures. It’s inspiring work by a dedicated team, and we’re excited about what our support will enable Launchpad to do.” - Hugh Milward, Director, Corporate Affairs, Microsoft Ltd.   Find out more about Launchpad, and see how you may be able to help here!    

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 6:00 am

Azure News on Friday (KW36/15)

Auch diese Woche gab’s wieder viele Nachrichten zur Microsoft Azure Plattform. Hier sind nähere Infos dazu… Aktuelle Neuigkeiten Datum Nachricht 03.09. New GS-Series VM Weitere Infos zu den neuen GS Instanzgrößen für Azure Virtual Machines (max. 32 CPUs, 448 GB RAM und SSDs). 03.09. Azure DocumentDB's LINQ provider just got better Azure DocumentDB LINQ Provider mit erweitertem Support für Operatoren wie Contains, String, Math und Array 03.09. Seamlessly Migrate Your Application from AWS to Azure in Four Simple Steps Schritt-für-Schritt-Anleitung zur Migration von AWS EC2 Ressourcen zu Azure Virtual Machines 03.09. Announcing the Microsoft Azure Tour Die Microsoft Azure Tour im Februar 2016 auch mit Halt in Frankfurt: 12 Sessions von Experten für Experten 02.09. Introducing Azure Service Bus Premium Messaging Premium Tier im Azure Service Bus mit dedizierten Messaging Units (1, 2 oder 4 VMs) für erhöhte Verlässlichkeit 02.09. Azure DocumentDB – G’Day Australia! Azure DocumentDB ist jetzt auch in Australien verfügbar 02.09. Announcing the Biggest VM Sizes Available in the Cloud: New Azure GS-VM Series Neue Azure Virtual Machine Größe GS verfügbar: bis zu 32 CPUs, 448 GB RAM und SSDs (bis zu 80.000 Disk IOPs) 02.09. Delicious data, smart agriculture: Caglayan Arkan explores the use of IoT in food production Neue Microsoft IoT case study zum Einsatz von IoT Technologien in der Lebensmittelproduktion 02.09. Download the new JDBC 4.2 for SQL Server Driver Neues für Java Devs, die mit Microsoft Azure SQL Database arbeiten wollen JDBC 4.2 for SQL Server Driver verfügbar 02.09. Boot Diagnostics for Virtual Machines v2 Console Output und Hyper-V Screenshot Support für Azure Virtual Machines v2 (Azure Resource Manager) 02.09. Announcing the GS-Series: Adding Premium Storage Support to the Largest VMs in the Public Cloud Azure Blog zur neuen Azure Virtual Machines Größe GS 02.09. Issue in Azure Storage Client Library 5.0.0 and 5.0.1 preview in AppendBlob functionality Problem in der Azure Storage Client Library 5.0.0 und 5.0.1 (Append Blobs überschrieben statt ergänzt) in neuen Versionen behoben 01.09. Azure Resource Manager Preview SDKs Für die Azure Resource Manager API gibt's jetzt entsprechende Preview SDKs für .NET, Java, Python, Go und Ruby 01.09. Data Movement in Big Data space through Azure Data Factory Schöne Kurz-Zusammenfassung über Möglichkeiten der Azure Data Factory 31.08. Mandatory Update for Azure Backup Agent Wichtiges Update für den Azure Backup Agent mit Fixes beim Zugiff auf Azure Storage und Zertifikate-Erneuerung Neue Videos Datum Nachricht Video 03.09. Lunch Break, ep. 2: Todd Bishop, Editor & Co-founder, GeekWire Neue Lunch Break Folge: Brad Anderson mit Todd Bishop (GeekWire.com) über alte Zunes, das neue Microsoft etc. 01.09. Tuesdays with Corey: The Mark Russinovich episode and Announcements Neues Video mit Corey Sanders - Themen: Docker on Windows, Apache Mesosphere und Cloudfoundry Unterstützung 28.08. Episode 184: Wowza with Chris Knowlton Video zum Zusammenspiel von Wowza Media Systems mit Microsoft Azure zum Media-Streaming

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 4:17 am

Microsoft Architectural Patterns and Practices–BluePrint Examples and Resources for Microsoft Azure

  The Microsoft blueprint resources illustrates real-world scenario that uses Microsoft Azure to manage and monitor the data flows. These example range from the very small to larger enterprise systems leveraging Azure Big Compute, Big Data, and infrastructure services including Batch, HDInsight, Machine Learning, Virtual Machines, Virtual Network and more to build cost-effective solutions. To build your next solution, check out the collection of scenario-based Microsoft Architectural Blueprints and additional resources on the Pattern & Practices GitHub repository which include source code and machine configurations Azure in education Using Azure in your research or in teaching a course? Microsoft is committed to supporting education and has various programs to meet your needs. Educators Empower faculty to leverage Microsoft Azure in teaching cutting edge courses Virtual Machines: Run Windows or Linux virtual machines in the cloud Mobile Services: Includes features that accelerate the development of mobile applications Media Services: Create, manage or distribute media Cloud Services: Build or extend existing enterprise applications Big Data: Process enormous amounts of data See all services The Educator Grant is a program designed specifically to provide access to Microsoft Azure to college and university professors teaching advanced courses. As part of the program, faculty teaching Azure in their curricula are awarded subscriptions to support their course. To apply for an Educator Grant fill out this simple application form. Apply now Researchers Accelerate the speed of scientific discovery with Microsoft Azure The Microsoft Azure for Research program accelerates scholarly and scientific research customized for academic, government, and industry researchers to use big data computations, collaboration, and data-intensive processing in the cloud. Take full advantage of the power and scalability of Microsoft Azure, a platform that supports frameworks like Azure Machine Learning and programing tools including Linux, Python, Java, Hadoop, and Microsoft .NET. Get access to a variety of tools and resources to maximize the benefits of cloud computing by the following: Free access to Azure cloud computing and storage (submit proposals for Azure for Research Awards) Training classes and webinars Technical resources and support Community discussion on LinkedIn (Microsoft Azure for Research group) and Twitter (@Azure4Research) For more information, visit www.azure4research.com.

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 4:12 am

Microsoft’s Imagine Access: The student’s one-stop shop for all things code

The following post comes from the Microsoft UK Faculty Connection Blog, and looks at some of the coding resources available to students through the Imagine Access programme. Microsoft’s Imagine Access: The student’s one-stop shop for all things code At Imagine Access, they will find the tools they need based on their skill level, in one location. Sometimes getting started in programming can be intimidating, but finding the tools to learn how to code shouldn’t be. That’s why we’ve created a single destination for all students developer resources, tools, software and tutorials. Imagine Access, your all-access pass to the software tools you need no matter your skill level or experience, and all at no cost to students! Imagine Access is now your single destination point for all resources whilst you are in education. Through Imagine Access, you can get all a single destination to all these resources including Full licensed versions of Microsoft Professional Developer Tools and Server Software for FREE including Windows Azure Cloud Services, Unity Game Engine and Xamarin. Microsoft Imagine Access is simply a resource to help you gain a competitive edge so you can turn your application or game into the next big thing. Jumpstart your creativity Empower your creativity and transform your ideas into real apps and games. Microsoft Imagine will help harness your vision and start you on the path to making it the next big thing. Imagine Cup brings together students from around the world interested in creating the technology of the future. With programs and competitions that foster cross discipline collaboration, you’ll turn brilliant ideas into amazing projects, while developing skills and connections that can launch your career Microsoft Virtual Academy helps you learn the latest technology, build your skills, and jumpstart your careers. With free, comprehensive, professionally developed training in 11 languages, you’ll keep learning and developing Channel 9 has dozens of webseries and special shows on every coding topic and technology you can imagine, all free. Plus special live shows where you can ask questions and get the real information you need to build your skills. Start by Building your future You’ve got the idea, Microsoft Imagine provides you with free professional developer tools and expert advice you need to complete your coding journey. Put your skills into action and start developing for any platform. Microsoft Imagine helps you build your future, one line of code at a time. Visual Studio Community 2015 is the foundation of your career in app and game development. Design, code, and debug your own apps for Windows, iOS, and Android. With Xamarin and Visual Studio Community 2015, you’ll become a mobile developer virtually overnight. you can get a free Xamarin subscription, giving you everything you need to create fully native mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows in C# or F# with Visual Studio. Microsoft Azure is the fastest and most flexible cloud platform around. And it’s the best way for you to create and develop your ideas for a global audience. The world works in the cloud and Microsoft Azure gets you developing for it today. Using Source Control GitHub The Student Developer Pack assembles a great set of tools and services, free to students! Get your own domain name with SSL, explore crowdsourcing, email services, and much more. Combined with the free Visual Studio Community 2015 and Visual Studio Online, it’s an unbeatable combination to get your coding project off the ground. Get your GitHub Student Developer Pack today! Ready to go from student to startup? BizSpark is here to help. It’s the free software, tools and support to build apps, the technology to get in the cloud and the exposure to get noticed — and funded. BizSpark ignites your business idea. Imagine Access is your portal to tools like Visual Studio Community 2013, the Unity Game Engine and Xamarin – everything you need to create apps, games and websites just like the pros. Make sure you Stand out Microsoft Imagine gives you the professional support you need to showcase your idea. Share your work with your family and friends. Sell it in the app store or even launch a startup. Show the world what you can do Imagine Cup provides you with a unique opportunity to grow your confidence and experience by competing on a global stage. Pitch your ideas to industry professionals, win cash prizes and be seen as the next generation of developers, entrepreneurs and innovators. Windows Store is where you can sell your universal apps that work on both Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone. With Microsoft Imagine you can get a free Store Developer Account and start publishing your apps. Check it out and get started on your first or next amazing game, app, website or service today! And don’t forget to tell us what you think of Imagine Access on Twitter (@MSFTImagine), Facebook or share a screenshot of what you’ve got going on Instagram. We want to hear from you.  Go make the next big thing. We’ll be waiting for you over at Imagine Access!

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 3:35 am

Microsoft’s Imagine Access: The student’s one-stop shop for all things code

The following post comes from the Microsoft UK Faculty Connection Blog, and looks at some of the coding resources available to students through the Imagine Access programme. Microsoft’s Imagine Access: The student’s one-stop shop for all things code At Imagine Access, they will find the tools they need based on their skill level, in one location. Sometimes getting started in programming can be intimidating, but finding the tools to learn how to code shouldn’t be. That’s why we’ve created a single destination for all students developer resources, tools, software and tutorials. Imagine Access, your all-access pass to the software tools you need no matter your skill level or experience, and all at no cost to students! Imagine Access is now your single destination point for all resources whilst you are in education. Through Imagine Access, you can get all a single destination to all these resources including Full licensed versions of Microsoft Professional Developer Tools and Server Software for FREE including Windows Azure Cloud Services, Unity Game Engine and Xamarin. Microsoft Imagine Access is simply a resource to help you gain a competitive edge so you can turn your application or game into the next big thing. Jumpstart your creativity Empower your creativity and transform your ideas into real apps and games. Microsoft Imagine will help harness your vision and start you on the path to making it the next big thing. Imagine Cup brings together students from around the world interested in creating the technology of the future. With programs and competitions that foster cross discipline collaboration, you’ll turn brilliant ideas into amazing projects, while developing skills and connections that can launch your career Microsoft Virtual Academy helps you learn the latest technology, build your skills, and jumpstart your careers. With free, comprehensive, professionally developed training in 11 languages, you’ll keep learning and developing Channel 9 has dozens of webseries and special shows on every coding topic and technology you can imagine, all free. Plus special live shows where you can ask questions and get the real information you need to build your skills. Start by Building your future You’ve got the idea, Microsoft Imagine provides you with free professional developer tools and expert advice you need to complete your coding journey. Put your skills into action and start developing for any platform. Microsoft Imagine helps you build your future, one line of code at a time. Visual Studio Community 2015 is the foundation of your career in app and game development. Design, code, and debug your own apps for Windows, iOS, and Android. With Xamarin and Visual Studio Community 2015, you’ll become a mobile developer virtually overnight. you can get a free Xamarin subscription, giving you everything you need to create fully native mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows in C# or F# with Visual Studio. Microsoft Azure is the fastest and most flexible cloud platform around. And it’s the best way for you to create and develop your ideas for a global audience. The world works in the cloud and Microsoft Azure gets you developing for it today. Using Source Control GitHub The Student Developer Pack assembles a great set of tools and services, free to students! Get your own domain name with SSL, explore crowdsourcing, email services, and much more. Combined with the free Visual Studio Community 2015 and Visual Studio Online, it’s an unbeatable combination to get your coding project off the ground. Get your GitHub Student Developer Pack today! Ready to go from student to startup? BizSpark is here to help. It’s the free software, tools and support to build apps, the technology to get in the cloud and the exposure to get noticed — and funded. BizSpark ignites your business idea. Imagine Access is your portal to tools like Visual Studio Community 2013, the Unity Game Engine and Xamarin – everything you need to create apps, games and websites just like the pros. Make sure you Stand out Microsoft Imagine gives you the professional support you need to showcase your idea. Share your work with your family and friends. Sell it in the app store or even launch a startup. Show the world what you can do Imagine Cup provides you with a unique opportunity to grow your confidence and experience by competing on a global stage. Pitch your ideas to industry professionals, win cash prizes and be seen as the next generation of developers, entrepreneurs and innovators. Windows Store is where you can sell your universal apps that work on both Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone. With Microsoft Imagine you can get a free Store Developer Account and start publishing your apps. Check it out and get started on your first or next amazing game, app, website or service today! And don’t forget to tell us what you think of Imagine Access on Twitter (@MSFTImagine), Facebook or share a screenshot of what you’ve got going on Instagram. We want to hear from you.  Go make the next big thing. We’ll be waiting for you over at Imagine Access!

Posted by on 4 September 2015 | 3:35 am